THE POSITIVE FUTURE

Listen/purchase: Touched by Various

Amazing collection of electronic music by some of the very best in the biz, all for MacMillan Cancer Support, a charity I really believe in. 

— 7 months ago
satwcomic:

Not Okay
The Norwegians are very proud of their cheese cutter, so when I told them most Danes use the other type they were not impressed. "I’ve never even SEEN that type. How does that even WORK? Oh my god, that’s so STUPID!" XD

I grew up with a Norwegian cheese cutter, but am loving the Danish one now… End the tyranny!

satwcomic:

Not Okay



The Norwegians are very proud of their cheese cutter, so when I told them most Danes use the other type they were not impressed. 

"I’ve never even SEEN that type. How does that even WORK? Oh my god, that’s so STUPID!" XD

I grew up with a Norwegian cheese cutter, but am loving the Danish one now… End the tyranny!

— 7 months ago with 692 notes
mariefalke:

Designer Matthew Hilton's Danish inspired desk in solid walnut and cast iron legs. This piece of furniture is a beautiful piece of work. Only one word can describe design like this: stunning!


Stunning desk WE WILL OWN ONE DAY. 
http://static.matthewhilton.com/resources//262/Orson_Desk_View_1_optimised.jpg

mariefalke:

Designer Matthew Hilton's Danish inspired desk in solid walnut and cast iron legs. This piece of furniture is a beautiful piece of work. Only one word can describe design like this: stunning!

Stunning desk WE WILL OWN ONE DAY. 

http://static.matthewhilton.com/resources//262/Orson_Desk_View_1_optimised.jpg

— 10 months ago with 1 note
futuramb:


CEOs look toward disruptive technology more than CMOs Scott Brinker, chiefmartec.com
CEOs look toward disruptive technology more than CMOs
CEOs have come to recognize, more than ever, that disruptive technology poses the single biggest existential threat to the future of their businesses. Or, on the optimistic side of that coin,…

Disruptive technologies are now the steady leader in what CEOs consider the most important external force shaping their company. This is inself in interesting observation. That CIOs and CMOs instead place Market Forces on firat place is also interesting.
I would argue that it witness on a different view of technology where CEOs don’t see technologies as a lot of systems and tools, but a deeper and more abstract change that among other things transforms markets and the way business is being conducted.
People involved in technology are more likely to have a more concrete view of the area and thus reduce the major force of technology into tools and systems which in reality changes how markets works.
If this analysis is true technology people are probably more blind to the row of other, deeper and more profound disruptive changes technology is having.
E g CIOs don’t see how that the disruptive change of technology is making the CIOs and the IT-departments increasingly obsolete.

futuramb:

CEOs look toward disruptive technology more than CMOs
Scott Brinker, chiefmartec.com

CEOs look toward disruptive technology more than CMOs

CEOs have come to recognize, more than ever, that disruptive technology poses the single biggest existential threat to the future of their businesses. Or, on the optimistic side of that coin,…

Disruptive technologies are now the steady leader in what CEOs consider the most important external force shaping their company. This is inself in interesting observation. That CIOs and CMOs instead place Market Forces on firat place is also interesting.

I would argue that it witness on a different view of technology where CEOs don’t see technologies as a lot of systems and tools, but a deeper and more abstract change that among other things transforms markets and the way business is being conducted.

People involved in technology are more likely to have a more concrete view of the area and thus reduce the major force of technology into tools and systems which in reality changes how markets works.

If this analysis is true technology people are probably more blind to the row of other, deeper and more profound disruptive changes technology is having.

E g CIOs don’t see how that the disruptive change of technology is making the CIOs and the IT-departments increasingly obsolete.

(via emergentfutures)

— 10 months ago with 55 notes
smarterplanet:

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet
IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn
YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.
“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”
So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.
“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”
Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”
Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”
And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

smarterplanet:

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet

IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.

“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”

So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.

“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”

Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”

Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”

And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

— 10 months ago with 27 notes

christiemealodigdes:

http://d3js.org

D3.js is a JavaScript library for manipulating documents based on data. D3 helps you bring data to life using HTML, SVG and CSS. D3’s emphasis on web standards gives you the full capabilities of modern browsers without tying yourself to a proprietary framework, combining powerful visualization components and a data-driven approach to DOM manipulation.

— 10 months ago with 1 note
drawingarchitecture:

'Isometric french town and train station'
Nigel Sussman

drawingarchitecture:

'Isometric french town and train station'

Nigel Sussman

— 10 months ago with 1092 notes
"If you are in school today the technologies you will use as an adult tomorrow have not been invented yet. Therefore, the life skill you need most is not the mastery of specific technologies, but mastery of the technium as a whole - how technology in general works."
Kevin Kelly (via inthenoosphere)

(via emergentfutures)

— 10 months ago with 1160 notes
drawingarchitecture:

‘Presentation drawing, City by the Sea mural (south wall), Midway Gardens.’
Frank Lloyd Wright.
Pencil, color pencil, gold ink, watercolor, and crayon on tracing paper.
(via Brain Pickings)

drawingarchitecture:

‘Presentation drawing, City by the Sea mural (south wall), Midway Gardens.’

Frank Lloyd Wright.

Pencil, color pencil, gold ink, watercolor, and crayon on tracing paper.

(via Brain Pickings)

(via positivefuture)

— 10 months ago with 388 notes
drawingarchitecture:

‘Presentation drawing, City by the Sea mural (south wall), Midway Gardens.’
Frank Lloyd Wright.
Pencil, color pencil, gold ink, watercolor, and crayon on tracing paper.
(via Brain Pickings)

drawingarchitecture:

‘Presentation drawing, City by the Sea mural (south wall), Midway Gardens.’

Frank Lloyd Wright.

Pencil, color pencil, gold ink, watercolor, and crayon on tracing paper.

(via Brain Pickings)

— 1 year ago with 388 notes

smarterplanet:

City Forward: An Award-Winning Lesson in the Use of Open Big Data | Citizen IBM Blog

Sponsored by IBM, the City Forward website can be used to compare a selected city’s characteristics and challenges to others around the world. In the process, users can identify trends, pinpoint similarities and get ideas for how a city may be improved. These city stories then can be shared and discussed within the City Forward Community.

Completely free of charge, City Forward connects to the work done by Smarter Cities Challenge teams around the world. The website provides data for more than 100 cities, and offers both city leaders and the public the unique ability to consolidate multiple data sources. The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS) recently recognized City Forward with its 2013 Corporate Social Responsibility Webby Award.

— 1 year ago with 23 notes
futurist-foresight:

A magnificent Birdseye view of this solar power array in Seville, Spain.
jeroenapers:

Hoe het veld met zonnepanelen van de Gemasolar Power Plant nabij Sevilla er van boven uit ziet. Heel vet!
(via cjwho:)
Read More

futurist-foresight:

A magnificent Birdseye view of this solar power array in Seville, Spain.

jeroenapers:

Hoe het veld met zonnepanelen van de Gemasolar Power Plant nabij Sevilla er van boven uit ziet. Heel vet!

(via cjwho:)

Read More

(Source: cjwho, via futurist-foresight)

— 1 year ago with 7374 notes
futurist-foresight:

Our daily Shuttle magnificence!
distant-traveller:

Shuttle Moon

As a gorgeous full Moon rose above the eastern horizon on February 7 2001, the Space Shuttle Atlantis streaked skyward towards an orbital rendezvous with the International Space Station. Watching from Orlando, Florida, about 60 miles west of the Kennedy Space Center launch site, photographer Tony DeVito captured this digital image, one of a series of pictures of the shuttle’s fiery climb. While foreground street lights flickered on and a clear evening sky grew dark, the shuttle’s path just grazed the bright lunar disk. On this mission, STS-98, Atlantis carried the U.S. Destiny laboratory module to be added to the expanding orbital outpost.

Image credit: Anthony DeVito

futurist-foresight:

Our daily Shuttle magnificence!

distant-traveller:

Shuttle Moon

As a gorgeous full Moon rose above the eastern horizon on February 7 2001, the Space Shuttle Atlantis streaked skyward towards an orbital rendezvous with the International Space Station. Watching from Orlando, Florida, about 60 miles west of the Kennedy Space Center launch site, photographer Tony DeVito captured this digital image, one of a series of pictures of the shuttle’s fiery climb. While foreground street lights flickered on and a clear evening sky grew dark, the shuttle’s path just grazed the bright lunar disk. On this mission, STS-98, Atlantis carried the U.S. Destiny laboratory module to be added to the expanding orbital outpost.

Image credit: Anthony DeVito

(via futurist-foresight)

— 1 year ago with 156 notes